Category Archives: transport

US Fossil Fuel Consumption Has Peaked, and Will Never Return

US fossil fuel consumption from coal, oil, and natural gas peaked ten years ago in 2007?at 85.927 quadrillion btu, and is unlikely to ever?return. There are a number of trends underneath that peak that are worth mentioning. Briefly, coal has been in superdecline; oil consumption is back to levels last seen in the late 1990’s; […]

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Getting on the Train

Dear Readers: I’m currently writing a long-form post twice a month now for Chris Martenson’s excellent website, Peak Prosperity.com. Accordingly, I’ll be publishing the first (and free) part of these essays here at คาสิโนออนไลน์ ฟรีเงิน2019 www.anastasiaartdesign.com. Enjoy. — Gregor Given emerging data in 2012, it’s becoming increasingly clear that the post-war automobile era in the United States […]

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The Demise of the Car

Dear Readers: I’m currently writing a long-form post twice a month now for Chris Martenson’s excellent website, Peak Prosperity.com. Accordingly, I’ll be publishing the first (and free) part of these essays here at คาสิโนออนไลน์ ฟรีเงิน2019 www.anastasiaartdesign.com. Enjoy. — Gregor India’s recent series of power blackouts, in which 600 million people lost electricity for several days, reminds us […]

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American Houses and the Oil Denominator

If there’s one asset the world has little use for, it’s an American single family home priced above 250K, reachable only by car. The great, post-war buildout of America’s suburbs relied upon the continuance of a favorable arbitrage between rising wages, and low transportation costs. Now that this profitable scheme has come to an end, […]

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The Great American False Dilemma: Austerity vs. Stimulus

Dear Readers: I’m currently writing a long-form post twice a month now for Chris Martenson’s excellent wesbsite. Accordingly, I’ll be publishing the first (and free) part of these essays here at คาสิโนออนไลน์ ฟรีเงิน2019 www.anastasiaartdesign.com. Enjoy. — Gregor ___________________________________________________________________________ “Like the issue of…’Is it better to have austerity or stimulus?’ Well, the basic problem there is that we’re […]

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Phantom Efficiencies: US Economy Still Running Very Slow

The US economy is consuming 2.00% less energy than its five year average seen prior to the 2008 financial crisis. Some will be cheered by this data, and indeed there are small nuggets of good news here. First, US consumption of oil—which turned flattish after the 2004 repricing—is down significantly, by over 10% since 2007. […]

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All My (Economist) Friends Get High: California Jobs

California reported its job numbers on Friday, and once again it was not good news. Although total California employment in January “rose” to 15.905 million people, this is only because December was revised down from 15.945 million to 15.878 million people. And November was revised downwards also. Thus, a full three years after the peak […]

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Eating Gasoline in America

Deep in the consensus-reality shared by post-war economists is the belief that the US economy transformed itself over the past thirty years, and now operates with much less sensitivity to energy costs. Indeed, in the cheap oil era and as the US developed its FIRE economy (finance, insurance, real estate), the energy inputs needed to […]

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Friday Notebook: Drive, Roads, Infinitum

Bottomless wonders spring from simple rules which are repeated without end.? –Benoit Mandelbrot Andrew Filippone’s short film Commute is reminiscent of both the early days of cinema, when the miracle of moving images was used to resolve questions about motion, and also the avant-garde period much later in the 1960’s when filmmakers used the camera […]

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Spring on the Tracks

Amherst, MA – Here in New England we live with the sedimentary layers of several historical periods and the legacy of our 19th century railroad era is all around us. You just have to look beneath the brambles of the lilacs, or follow the small traces along your local bike path. Of course, we still […]

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